A Travellerspoint blog

Beautiful Bamberg.

sunny

Looking towards Little Venice - Bamberg

Looking towards Little Venice - Bamberg

Bamberg.

When we were planning our holiday, I was all in favour of dropping Bamberg because I thought we wouldn’t be able to move there for huge numbers of tour groups. I was wrong. Bamberg was a wonderful, beautiful, historic town and while there were tour groups, no­where we went was overcrowded. We went to Bamberg for the day by train from Fuerth. We walked into the historic centre from the train station. There were three main areas of Bamberg that we concentrated on. One area was theisland where the old town hall was located. This was the most crowded part and very scenic. After looking around there we climbed up to St Michael’s Monastery – a beautiful building and an area from which there were lovely views over the cathedral, castle and Bamberg’s vineyards. The third area was the area around the cathedral. T his was quite busy as there was a biker’s church service taking place there and the dom platz was filled with motorbikes.

Modern Sculpture in Old Town - Bamberg

Modern Sculpture in Old Town - Bamberg

Bamberg Tourist Office.

Bamberg Tourist Office is helpful and will issue you with brochures and a free map of Bamberg. It is also set next to a very pretty garden filled with roses and statues. We enjoyed taking a well­ deserved rest in the gardens here after exploring Bamberg on foot.

Bamberg Tourist Office

Bamberg Tourist Office

Bamberg Tourist Office

Bamberg Tourist Office

Concordia.

Concordia is a palace on the water. You cannot go inside, but it is quite picturesque. There was a bridge with interesting modern art nearby. Concordia sometimes hosts art exhibitions.

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

Concordia

The Karmeliten Kloster.

The Carmelite Cloister dates from the twelfth century. It is dedicated to Saint Theodor. The nuns belonging to that cloister worked as nurses. We were able to take a look inside the church and it was quite pretty and interesting.

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

The Karmeliten Kloster

Around the Cathedral.

The area around the cathedral has some wonderful traditional buildings. I loved the old wooden buildings and the strange house with lots of dolls gazing out from its windows. It is well worth taking a walk around this area after visiting the cathedral.

Around the Cathedral

Around the Cathedral

Around the Cathedral

Around the Cathedral

Around the Cathedral

Around the Cathedral

The Rose Garden.

Near the cathedral there is a stunningly lovely rose garden with excellent views towards St Michael’s Monastery. There are also good views over Bamberg. The garden was filled with beautiful roses in many beautiful colours. There were also lots of statues of Ancient Greek gods and goddesses. These were created by Ferdinand Tietz in 1760. The rose gardens themselves were created by Balthasar Neumann.

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden

Bamberg Cathedral.

Bamberg Cathedral is called the Cathedral of St Peter’s and St George’s. It was built in 1002 in the reign of Emperor Heinrich 1. The cathedral has been burnt down and rebuilt. Heinrich I’s tomb is inside the cathedral. The most famous feature though is a sculpture called the Bamberg Rider – an equestrian sculpture. Underneath it is a carving which I think is of a green man – an ancient fertility symbol. The cathedral is extremely beautiful and well worth a visit. When we were visiting the cathedral there was a bikers’ service going on outside. The domplatz was filled with motorbikes.

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg Cathedral

Saint Michael’s Monastery.

This building is located on a hilltop. There are wonderful views from here towards the cathedral, Bamberg’s Castle and across Bamberg’s vineyards. St Michael’s Monastery was built in 1015 by Henrich I. Over the years it has been damaged by earthquakes and uprisings. It has been beautifully restored. There are charming gardens around it and several interesting statues. Across from the front of the monastery there is a brewery museum. The monks of St Michael’s began brewing beer in the 1100s.

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael’s Monastery

Saint Michael's Monastery. - Bamberg

Saint Michael's Monastery. - Bamberg

The Old Slaughter House.

The Old Slaughter House is located on Am Kranen. There is an ox carved on the façade. Boat trips on the river leave from near here. This is a very picturesque area. We did not have time to take a boat trip on this occasion.

The Old Slaughter House

The Old Slaughter House

Grunermarkt.

Grunermarkt has an interesting church – Saint Martin’s. There is also a very attractive Fountain of Neptune here. We sat here for a while and just watched the people passing by and the children playing around the fountain.

Grunermarkt

Grunermarkt

Grunermarkt

Grunermarkt

Grunermarkt

Grunermarkt

Little Venice.

From the bridge near the town hall you can see Little Venice. This is an area of pretty fishermen’s houses. They look beautiful from Bamberg’s bridges, but if you walk to them you can only view them from the back. There is no walk way at the front.

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Bamberg Old Town Hall.

Bamberg Old Town Hall is one of the most famous buildings in Bamberg. It is located on an artificial island in the middle of the Regnitz River. This island was built by the local people because the bishop in charge of Bamberg would not allow them to build a town hall on Episcopal land. The Rottmeister home is attached to the town hall. The town hall is covered with frescoes. There are lovely views up and down the river from here towards several of Bamberg’s bridges. The town hall dates from 1462.

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Bamberg Old Town Hall

Judenstrasse.

Jewish Street has several attractive buildings. I loved the cat that had found itself a great location for an afternoon nap. This street was obviously once home to Bamberg's Jewish community. It is a pleasant place for a leisurely stroll.

Judenstrasse

Judenstrasse

Judenstrasse

Judenstrasse

Judenstrasse

Judenstrasse

Shop Signs.

Bamberg like most old German towns has wonderful shop signs. In this set I particularly like the animal ones: the fox holding its pretzel and the rooster. These signs always attract my attention whenever I'm strolling around any European Old Town. These were also my favourites. I love the stork one which I think is really cute and I buy up wine glasses like that as souvenirs. I have some Austrian and German ones, so far my collection is from Vienna, Bamberg, Passau, Regensburg and Rothenburg.

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs Again

Shop Signs Again

Shop Signs Again

Shop Signs Again

Shop Signs Again

Shop Signs Again

Face Sculptures.

Some of the buildings in Bamberg have beautiful engraved or painted faces. I love looking at these on old buildings and always take lots of photos of them. Some of the faces are amusing, some scary, some filled with character.

Face Sculptures

Face Sculptures

Face Sculptures

Face Sculptures

Face Sculptures

Face Sculptures

Posted by irenevt 23:17 Archived in Germany Comments (0)

Roaming around Regensburg.

semi-overcast

Lion Sculpture - Regensburg

Lion Sculpture - Regensburg

Regensburg.

Regensburg is a beautiful, historical city located on the Danube River. There has been a settlement in this area since Ancient Roman times when the Castra Regina Roman Fort was established here in 179AD. Later in the sixth century Regensburg became the capital of Bavaria. Then from 1663 until 1806 Regensburg was the home of the Parliament of the Holy Roman Empire. Regensburg’s old town largely survived World War 11 intact. We visited Regensburg for the day from Passau. There is no direct train between the two and you have to change at Plattling. Although we liked Regensburg, I was disappointed by the old stone bridge which was being restored when we visited. I think it may have been damaged in the floods of the previous year. However, Regensburg did have one of the most beautiful cathedrals I have ever seen, several lovely churches, pleasant squares and fountains.

Church Door - Regensburg

Church Door - Regensburg

Burial Place of Kepler.

Astronomer Johannes Kepler is buried in this church which is located near the station. The church was not open when we visited.

- Regensburg

- Regensburg

- Regensburg

- Regensburg

The Alte Kappele.

The Alte Kappele meaning the Old Chapel is located on Alter Kornmarkt near the cathedral. It is believed there may have been a church at this location from Ancient Roman times. The present church dates from the eighteenth century when it was rebuilt in rococo style. This church is extremely ornate and beautiful. I visited twice. On my first visit I could wander around it freely. On my second visit parts were closed off behind railings.

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

The Alte Kappele - Regensburg

Neupfarr Platz.

Neupfarr Platz is a beautiful square. It is home to the Neupfarr Kirche. The church here was built in 1540 and occupies the site of a former synagogue. In the Middle Ages this area was Regensburg's Jewish Ghetto.

Neupfarr Platz - Regensburg

Neupfarr Platz - Regensburg

The Cathedral - Dom St. Peter.

The Cathedral in Regensburg is called St Peter’s Dom. It dates from 700 AD. Its two massive spires are visible from many parts of the city. The exterior of the cathedral is covered with beautiful sculptures. One rather controversial one is a Judensau. This shows Jews suckling milk from a sow and originally faced towards the Jewish Quarter of Regensburg. It was there as an insult towards the Jewish population. Of course, nowadays such symbols are considered unacceptable, but it has been kept for historical reasons. The exterior of the cathedral also has some great gargoyles. Inside the cathedral there are many images of Saint Peter. He is generally depicted holding the key to heaven. Other famous sights in the cathedral include the lovely smiling angel. This depiction of Gabriel was sculpted in 1280 by the Master of St Erminold.

Cathedral spires. - Regensburg

Cathedral spires. - Regensburg

Peter with Canine Friend. - Regensburg

Peter with Canine Friend. - Regensburg

The Jewish Sow - Regensburg

The Jewish Sow - Regensburg

Gargoyle - Regensburg

Gargoyle - Regensburg

The Cathedral - Regensburg

The Cathedral - Regensburg

Carvings of saints - Regensburg

Carvings of saints - Regensburg

The Smiling angel. - Regensburg

The Smiling angel. - Regensburg

The Theatre.

Regensburg Theatre Square has a lovely fountain and this great statue outside it. We enjoyed wandering around this area of town.

Sculpture outside theatre - Regensburg

Sculpture outside theatre - Regensburg

Fountain outside theatre - Regensburg

Fountain outside theatre - Regensburg

The David and Goliath Mural: Goliathhaus.

This painting on the wall of a tower house shows the battle between David and Goliath. It dates from the sixteenth century.

The David and Goliath Mural - Regensburg

The David and Goliath Mural - Regensburg

The Altes Rathaus: Old Town Hall ­ Altes Rathaus.

Regensburg’s Old Town Hall was home to the German parliament for almost 150 years. It is quite an attractive building.

The Altes Rathaus - Regensburg

The Altes Rathaus - Regensburg

The Altes Rathaus - Regensburg

The Altes Rathaus - Regensburg

Town Hall courtyard. - Regensburg

Town Hall courtyard. - Regensburg

Holy Trinity Church.

We visited Holy Trinity Church simply because we were walking passed it on our way to St Jakob’s Church. The church had a yard filled with ornate and beautiful tombstones. We also went up the tower of the church. Price 2Euros for views over Regensburg.

View from church tower - Regensburg

View from church tower - Regensburg

View from church tower - Regensburg

View from church tower - Regensburg

Tombstones - Regensburg

Tombstones - Regensburg

Tombstone - Regensburg

Tombstone - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob.

This church dates from the late twelfth century and was the abbey church of a sect of Scottish or possibly Irish monks. Its façade is covered with a series of beautiful sculptures. I also liked this church inside.

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

Schottenkirche St Jacob - Regensburg

The Haidplatz.

Nowadays the haidplatz is an attractive square with many interesting buildings and a statue of justice in its midst. The haid which means meadow was originally outside the city walls. It was a market area. There are several legends associated with this square. Long ago a powerful and sadistic knight from Hungary came to Regensburg and threatened to seize control of the city unless someone was brave enough to fight him. This challenge was taken up by a prisoner who was awaiting the death sentence. As he was due to die anyway, he saw no reason not to accept. The Hungarian knight was too strong for the prisoner and after a short fight he easily knocked him to the ground. As the Hungarian knight was about to finish him off, the prisoner suddenly saw a golden cross in the sky. This miraculous sight filled the prisoner with renewed strength and in one final surge he defeated and killed the Hungarian knight. He was given his freedom and became a hero. There is a hotel on the haidplatz called the Goldener Kreuze in memory of this event. At one time the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V stayed here. He had an affair with a maid servant who worked in the Goldener Kreuze and she bore him an illegitimate son. This son was taken away from his mother and brought up in secret. When his father died, his half­ brother King Philip II of Spain acknowledged him and he became known as Don Juan of Austria. He went on to be a very successful general who fought against the Turks. On the music shop on Haidplatz there is a small carving of a mouse. If you rub it, it is supposed to bring good luck.

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

The Haidplatz - Regensburg

Don Juan of Austria - Regensburg

Don Juan of Austria - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge.

The old stone bridge of Regensburg spans the Danube River. It was a mess during our visit as it is being restored. I think it may have been damaged in the floods of the previous year. This bridge dates from the twelfth century. Under the bridge there are several islands and you can go down steps from the bridge to the islands. We did this for views back over the old town. Take insect repellent if you go, we were surrounded by midges. In the middle of the bridge sits the Bruckmandl – the little man of the bridge. He was missing an arm and part of his head when we visited and will also hopefully also be restored. There is an old legend about the bridge. The bridge’s builder had a dispute with the cathedral’s builder about who would finish building first. As the bridge builder thought he was losing, he made a pact with the devil promising him the first three souls that crossed over the bridge if he finished first. With the devil’s help, the bridge builder finished first, but at the official opening of the bridge, the builder cheated the devil by chasing a dog, cat and chicken across the bridge before any people crossed.

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

The Old Stone Bridge - Regensburg

Views from the Islands.

There are good views from the islands back towards the old town. One thing to note about the islands though in summer there are lots of mosquitoes here.

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Views from the Islands - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl: Old Sausage Kitchen. ­

On the edge of the Danube next to the stone bridge there is a famous wurstkuchl or sausage kitchen which specializes in cooking the city’s famous Regensburger sausasages.

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Historische Wurstkuchl - Regensburg

Shop Signs.

Regensburg had lots of great shop signs. I particularly liked the giant key and the two­headed eagle. The elephant sign reminds me very much of Thailand. These are all lovely to look at and extremely photogenic. Address: Regensburg.

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Shop Signs

Posted by irenevt 22:53 Archived in Germany Comments (0)

Rothenburg am Tauber - Famous Old German Town.

2015

sunny

- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

We first became interested in visiting Rothenburg ob der Tauber when I saw pictures of it in a guide book to Germany, but it took us a long time to visit because I had heard it was swarming with tour groups. This did not appeal to us, but this year we took a chance on it and discovered the rumours were exaggerated. We really enjoyed our visit here. We arrived reasonably early before the tour groups arrived and even when they did arrive, they were concentrated in the central squares and could be avoided.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

We travelled to Rothenburg from Augsburg by three trains. It sounds difficult but German Rail is so well organised it was really easy. Trains connect time wise and changing train very frequently only meant walking across a platform. The old part of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a walled city. One of the highlights of it was walking around these walls and enjoying the wonderful views over the town.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Cemetery and Church.

To get to the old part of Rothenburg ob der Tauber from the station go left down Bahnhof Strasse then right onto Ansbacher Strasse. Before we reached the walled city, we passed a cemetery and a pretty little church. We had a stroll round the churchyard and a quick look in the church where a service was going on. One of the interesting gravestones had elephants on it and the name Tarzan. It belonged to a circus performer from Rothenburg ob der Tauber.

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Cemetery Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Cemetery - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Cemetery - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Cemetery - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Cemetery - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Walls and Gates.

The old centre of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is surrounded by walls and six gates: Klingen Gate, Burg Gate, Kobolzell Gate, Spital Bastion, Roder Gate and Gallows Gate. We walked on the walls from Klingen Gate to Siebers Tower. There were some excellent views over the town and the walls were not busy. Unlike many other old walled towns, there is no fee to go up on the walls. Burg Gate leads into Rothenburg from the Burg Garden. It dates from 1356. It has two round guard houses and a mask through which the soldiers defending Rothenbourg could pour hot tar onto their enemies. Gallows Gate was the place where executions took place in Mediaeval Times.

-  Entrance Gate Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Entrance Gate Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Gates and Walls Rothenburg ob der Tauber

- Gates and Walls Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gates and Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gates and Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

The Mask  Burg Gate- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

The Mask Burg Gate- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gateway - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gateway - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gates and Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Gates and Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

walls andTowers- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

walls andTowers- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls.

As you walk around the walls of Rothenbourg ob der Tauber, you get wonderful views over the town. Many of the houses have picturesque red roofs. There are also towers and other beautiful old buildings. Walking the walls was the highlight of our visit for me.

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Views from the walls. - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Walk the Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Walk the Walls - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

The Burg Garden.

The Burg Garden used to be the site of Rothenburg's Castle. This was destroyed in an earthquake in 1356. The gardens are very pleasant places to sit and rest in or go for a stroll in. They have statues, flowers and good views over the town and surrounding countryside.

Burgarten - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Burgarten - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Burgarten- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Burgarten- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Burg Garten - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Burg Garten - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz.

The Market Square is a busy part of Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Here you will find the Rathaus or Town Hall, the Clock Tower which is now the tourist office and Saint George's Fountain which dates from around 1608. While we were here, there was a weird balancing act going on. I can only guess there was some kind of seating structure hidden within their clothes.

Balancing Act - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Balancing Act - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Marktplatz- Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Siebers Tower.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber is picturesque everywhere in the old town, but one of the most beautiful areas is around Siebers Tower. This tower dates from around 1385. It was the main entrance into Rothenburg for about 150 years before the Spital Bastion was built. Next to Siebers Tower is the beautiful Plonlein Triangular Place. This place has a pretty little fountain.

Plonlein Triangular Place - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Plonlein Triangular Place - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Plonlein Triangular Place - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Plonlein Triangular Place - Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Teddy Bears.

One of the things we really enjoyed about Rothenburg ob der Tauber were the shops selling rather cute, cuddly and attractive teddy bears. There was one on the way to the Burg Garden and one on the way to Spital Bastion.

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Teddy Bears

Street Signs.

Like many European towns Rothenburg ob den Tauber had some wonderful signs for shops and businesses. I love these signs as they add a lot of character to the streets and take an absolutely excellent photograph.

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Street Signs

Storks On Roofs.

Favorite thing: As we walked towards the Market Square from the Roder Gate we could see a roof top with a stork's nest on it. I love these. They are so beautiful. I took photos using my zoom but they are a bit fuzzy as it was a long way away.

Storks On Roofs.

Storks On Roofs.

Storks On Roofs.

Storks On Roofs.

Storks On Roofs.

Storks On Roofs.

Flowers.

One of the lovely things about Rothenburg ob der Tauber were the colourful flowers either in the Burg Garden or just around the streets. They made the town look very summery and very attractive.

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Flowers

Posted by irenevt 20:31 Archived in Germany Comments (4)

Munich - City of Beer.

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Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Munich is one of these places that we have been to many, many times but always very briefly. Sometimes we are just changing trains. At other times we are staying for two nights allowing us one full day to see the city. This visit we flew from Hong Kong via Qatar and arrived in Munich in the evening. Despite being jetlagged we took ourselves off to the centre and visited Marienplatz, the Cathedral, Karlsplatz. Then it was early to bed and early flight to Sarajevo. When we returned having travelled from Bosnia to Croatia, we stayed in Munich for two nights giving us just one full day. On our full day we visited the Nymphenburg, the BMW Museum, the Olympic Park, the English Gardens and the Hofgarten.

Signs, Munich. - Munich

Signs, Munich. - Munich

Munich is an interesting city in itself as well as being a gateway to other interesting parts of Bavaria and, of course, it is the host of the annual Octoberfest Festival. We returned to Munich briefly yet again in July 2015. We just spent a few hours here before travelling on to Augsburg

Marienplatz.

Marienplatz Square used to be a market place, but then in 1807 Marienplatz's market moved to the nearby Viktualienmarkt. The large column at the center of the square is the column of St. Mary. It was built in 1638. On top of it there is a statue of the Virgin Mary dating from 1590. Marienplatz is the site of Munich's old and new town halls. It is dominated by the New Town Hall. The new town hall was built between 1867 and 1909 by Georg Joseph Hauberrisser. At 11, 12 and 17 o'clock each day, visitors can watch the famous Glockenspiel or carillon. Near the town hall is a small fountain, the Fischbrunnen or Fish Fountain. This was designed by sculptor Konrad Knoll in 1864. The fountain was destroyed during World War II. It was rebuilt in 1954. The original Old Town Hall was completely destroyed by fire in 1460. Between 1470 and 1480, the old town hall was rebuilt by Jörg von Halsbach. It was rebuilt again after World War 11.

Marienplatz, old town hall. - Munich

Marienplatz, old town hall. - Munich

Marienplatz, new town hall. - Munich

Marienplatz, new town hall. - Munich

Marienplatz, Munich. - Munich

Marienplatz, Munich. - Munich

The New Town Hall.

This visit we wandered inside the courtyard of the new town hall. The New Town Hall is home to Munich's city government, city council and the offices of the mayor. The new town hall was built between 1867 and 1908 by Georg von Hauberrisser in Gothic Revival style. It has around 400 rooms. There is a large restaurant ­ Ratskeller ­ in the basement.

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

The New Town Hall - Munich

Juliet Statue.

I was surprised to see this statue in Munich and thought that it looked exactly like the Juliet statue in Verona. I did not realise Munich is twinned with Verona. The Juliet statue is a gift to the people of Munich from the people of Verona. They received it in 1974. It is a custom to present the statue with flowers or like the one in Verona rub her breast for luck. This statue is located on the southern side of the old town hall.

Juliet Statue

Juliet Statue

Juliet Statue

Juliet Statue

Munich Cathedral - Frauenkirche ­ Cathedral Church of Our Lady.

Munich Cathedral is also known as the Frauenkirche. The foundation stone of the cathedral was laid by Duke Sigismund in 1468 and the cathedral was built in just 20 years. This building was severely damaged in the Second World War. After the war, the cathedral was restored in phases but was not completely restored till the 1990s. One of the most notable monuments in the church is the tomb of emperor Ludwig IV of Bavaria. This tomb is surrounded by statues of four kneeling knights. The cathedral's crypt has the tombs of members of the Wittelsbach family who ruled over Bavaria for centuries. Munich Cathedral is rather plain inside, but has beautiful stone carvings on the outside. During our visit the towers of the cathedral were being restored. On our last visit we spent more time looking round the insides of Munich Cathedral than on previous visits and found it really quite interesting inside. It has lovely stain glass windows, interesting tombs, a crypt. The outside of the building is still being renovated and so did not take a good photo.

The Cathedral. - Munich

The Cathedral. - Munich

The Cathedral. - Munich

The Cathedral. - Munich

The Cathedral. - Munich

The Cathedral. - Munich

Reflections of the Cathedral. - Munich

Reflections of the Cathedral. - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Inside Munich Cathedral - Munich

Statue of a Wild Boar.

There is a statue of a wild boar outside the entrance of the German Hunting and Fishing Museum. You will find it if you walk along the Neuhauserstrasse from Karlsplatz to Marienplatz. It is considered to be lucky to rub its nose.

Wild boar. - Munich

Wild boar. - Munich

Karlsplatz.

Karlsplatz is known locally as Stachus. It is a large square in the center of Munich, On the square there is a big fountain in the summer. In the winter there is an open ­air ice rink. Underground there is a shopping center. At the entrance to this square there is an attractive looking gate called Karl's Tor. Nearby there is an interesting spitting fountain. During our visit an event involving Turkish youth was taking place here.

Karl's Tor. - Munich

Karl's Tor. - Munich

Karl's Tor. - Munich

Karl's Tor. - Munich

Spitting Fountain. - Munich

Spitting Fountain. - Munich

Karl's Platz Fountain. - Munich

Karl's Platz Fountain. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg.

The Nymphenburg Palace was commissioned in 1664 by Elector Ferdinand Maria, to celebrate the birth of his son, Maximilian Emanuel. Later in 1770 Maximilian Emanuel, the young man for whom the castle was built, made additions to it. He added galleries and pavilions, extending the sides of the Palace. We did not go inside the palace. We walked to it via a little building surrounded with statues and containing the statue of a stag in its centre and also via its long canal. Then we wandered its pond and statue filled gardens.

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

Schloss Nymphenburg. - Munich

BMW Building and Museum.

Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) is one of the largest companies in Munich. It was founded in 1913. BMW started off by building aeroplane engines. Then in 1923 they started building motorbikes. After that in 1928 they began producing cars. Shortly after the Second World War, BMW's factories were dismantled by the Allied Forces. The company was then only allowed to make household utensils and bicycles.In 1950 BMW began producing cars again. The main attractions for visitors to BMW is the four­ cylinder BMW tower and the bowl­ shaped museum next to it. The museum shows the technical development of cars and motorcycles as well as having some exhibits about the history of the company. I am not interested in cars but enjoyed looking at the Rolls Royce. There is also a pleasant cafe and clean toilets in the museum.

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Tower. - Munich

BMW Tower. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

BMW Museum. - Munich

Olympia Park and Stadium.

The Olympiapark in Munich was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Area includes: the Olympic sports facilities, such as the Olympic Stadium and swimming pool; the Olympic Hall with the Olympic Tower; the Olympic Villages: one male, one female; Olympic Media City, which is now the home of the Olympic Shopping Centre and Olympic Park which includes the Olympic Mountain and Olympic Lake. The area was quite chaotic during our visit with stalls, a fairground, lorries coming and going and lots of models of dinosaurs. I found the swimming pool very impressive. I also enjoyed climbing the hill for a view over the site. You can also go up the tower for a view, but we did not.

Olympic Hill and Lake. - Munich

Olympic Hill and Lake. - Munich

Olympic Stadium. - Munich

Olympic Stadium. - Munich

Olympic Tower. - Munich

Olympic Tower. - Munich

Olympic Swimming Pool - Munich

Olympic Swimming Pool - Munich

Olympic Park viewed from Olympic Hill. - Munich

Olympic Park viewed from Olympic Hill. - Munich

The English - Garden Englischer Garten.

The English Garden is a huge park in the centre of Munich. It has restaurants, beer halls, a lake to wander around, a stream, a Chinese Tower and other attractions that we did not have time to visit. There are lots of places to eat and drink by the Chinese Tower. There was also live traditional German music there during our visit.

The English Gardens - the lake. - Munich

The English Gardens - the lake. - Munich

The English Gardens - Beer Hall. - Munich

The English Gardens - Beer Hall. - Munich

The English Gardens - Chinese Tower. - Munich

The English Gardens - Chinese Tower. - Munich

The Hofgarten.

The Hofgarten (Court Garden) is in the center of Munich. On one side of it is the Residence; on the other side is the English Garden. It is also near the Staatskanzlei ­ State Chancellry. The garden was built in 1613–1617 by Maximilian I. It is an Italian style Renaissance garden. In the center of the garden is a pavilion to Diana, goddess of hunting and the moon. This was built in 1615 by Heinrich Schön the elder. A path leads from each of the eight arches of the pavillion. On the roof of the Diana pavilion is a replica of a sculpture of Bavaria by Hubert Gerhard. This was created in 1623. The Theatinerkirche is a lovely church near the Hofgarten, just across the main road. The garden was destroyed during World War II then later rebuilt. The nearest U-­Bahn to the garden is Odeonsplatz.

The Hofgarten with the Theatinerkirche. - Munich

The Hofgarten with the Theatinerkirche. - Munich

Sculpture of Bavaria, Hofgarten. - Munich

Sculpture of Bavaria, Hofgarten. - Munich

The State Chancellry. - Munich

The State Chancellry. - Munich

Theatinerkirche. - Munich

Theatinerkirche. - Munich

The Old Botanic Gardens - Alter Botanischer Garten. ­

Having a few hours to spend in Munich when we arrived there very early on a flight from Doha, we wandered first to the old botanic gardens which are quite close to the main train station. These gardens were created between 1804 and 1814 by landscape architect Frederick Louis Sckell. When the new botanic gardens opened in 1914, the old gardens became a public park. As well as lots of trees and colourful flowers there is a restaurant here and a fountain depicting the god Neptune.

The Old Botanic Gardens - Munich

The Old Botanic Gardens - Munich

The Old Botanic Gardens - restaurant - Munich

The Old Botanic Gardens - restaurant - Munich


The Old Botanic Gardens - Munich

The Old Botanic Gardens - Munich

Neptune's Fountain - Munich

Neptune's Fountain - Munich

Looking towards the court buildings. - Munich

Looking towards the court buildings. - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain.

We decided to walk into the centre of Munich by a different route from our usual one. This proved to be a good idea as we saw lots of new and interesting things. One of these was the Wittelsbach Fountain. The Wittelsbach Fountain was built at the end of the nineteenth century by German sculptor Adolf von Hildebrand. He created the winning design in a competition to build a fountain to celebrate the construction of Munich's new water supply system. The fountain gets its name from the House of Wittelsbach, who ruled over Bavaria for more than seven hundred years. The bowl of the fountain is flanked by two marble statues. These represent the positive and negative aspects of water. On one side the statue of a young man sitting on a sea horse and throwing a stone symbolizes the destructive power of water. On the other side the statue of a water nymph, sitting on a bull and holding a goblet, symbolizes the beneficial power of water.

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Wittelsbach Fountain - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Promenadeplatz.

We walked down Promenade Platz a grassy area lined with many statues. To our surprise, the base of one of the statues, a statue of Orlando di Lasso ­ a Renaissance composer, was covered with Michael Jackson memorabilia and has been made into a Michael Jackson shrine. This shrine is located outside Munich's Bayerischer Hof Hotel, where Jackson often stayed when he visited Munich. The shrine appeared the day after Jackson’s death in 2009. Although no-­one had official permission to create the shrine, it has been tolerated by Munich authorities and has become a tourist attraction. However, apparently a dispute has broken out between two rival groups of Michael Jackson fans: MJ’s Legacy, and MJ Memorial Munich. They have been removing each other's tributes and scuffles have broken out. Munich authorities have threatened to remove the shrine unless the two groups start to get along.

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

The Michael Jackson Shrine - Munich

Sculpture of Maximilian von Montgelas - Promenadeplatz.

A bit further along Promenade Platz we were surprised to see a gigantic metal sculpture of a man. It turned out to be a statue of former Bavarian statesman Maximilian von Montgelas who lived from 1759 to1838. The sculpture is made out of aluminium. It was created by Karin Sander in 2005.

Sculpture of Maximilian von Montgelas. - Munich

Sculpture of Maximilian von Montgelas. - Munich

Sculpture of Maximilian von Montgelas - Munich

Sculpture of Maximilian von Montgelas - Munich

Christopher Street Day.

We arrived in Munich on July 11th 2015. There was a lot of partying and celebrating going on. We had no idea why. It turned out to be Munich Christopher Street Day! This is apparently the biggest gay and lesbian celebration in Bavaria. It takes place every July and lasts for nine days. We started by watching the Schuhplattler dancing taking place in Marienplatz. With our usual impeccable timing this was just ending as we arrived.

The very first Christopher Street Day took place in 1980 so 2015's celebrations were the 36th to be carried out. Around 200,000 people took part. There was a huge procession of floats travelling around the city centre. We spent some time watching the festivities.

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Marien Platz on Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

Marien Platz on Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Christopher Street Day Parade - Munich

Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

Munich Christopher Street Day - Munich

On our last overnight stay in Munich we stayed in the hotel below.

LetoMotel Muenchen Moosach: Great Stay.

We got here by s -­bahn from the airport in about half an hour. Get off at Moosach Station. You cannot miss the hotel; it is practically on the station platform. Check-­in was friendly and efficient. There were many tourist information brochures available and we were given free maps. Our room was small but clean and comfortable. Although it was directly above the station, it was well sound proofed and we heard no train noise. The room had tea/coffee making facilities, but no safe or fridge. There was a bakery very close to the hotel from which we purchased breakfast. There were also some restaurants, fast food restaurants and bars near the hotel. Public transport facilities from the hotel were excellent. you can get to the centre by s-­bahn or u­-bahn in about 15 minutes. The hotel was quiet at night and we slept well. We stayed here twice and would happily stay here again. Address: Bunzlauer Str. 5, Munich, Bavaria, 80992, Germany.

Posted by irenevt 16:40 Archived in Germany Comments (2)

Augsburg - City of Fountains.

Beautiful churches - Augsburg

Beautiful churches - Augsburg

Augsburg.

Augsburg was founded in 15BC by the Roman emperor Augustus, whose fountain adorns the town's main square. It is the second oldest city in Germany. The town's most famous family were the Fuggers who dominated the banking industry. Jacob Fugger, who was once the world's wealthiest man, founded the Fuggerei area in 1521. This area of low rent housing was the world's first welfare housing project.

On our first visit we only had around 4 hours in Augsburg as we largely just passed through on our way from Nurnberg to Vils. Our original plan was to spend the night in Augsburg, but I persuaded my husband to spend 2 nights in Nurnberg instead. The city was not at its best during our visit as almost every road seemed to be being dug up and resurfaced. Combine that with the fact that I had injured my feet prior to our visit and had to hobble round everywhere and it did not render this one of our best trips. We returned to Augsburg for a second visit in July 2015. This time we spent two nights in the city. We had a very different experience from our first visit. The city was no longer dug up. We found some very beautiful places to explore and really enjoyed our time here. We stayed in the Ibis Augsburg Hauptbahnhof.

Ibis Augsburg Hauptbahnhof: Convenient for the station.

We stayed in this hotel for two nights. It was located just a couple of minutes walk from the train station. Check in was fine. The room was the normal Ibis room. It was clean. It was basic but comfortable enough. It had free wifi which worked well. It was lovely and quiet at night and we slept very well here. Breakfast was pretty good. I especially liked the coffee machine. There was indoor and outdoor seating. We sat outdoors. Breakfast selection included bread, rolls, cold meat, cheese, ceral, fruit juices. The hotel was convenient for walking into the centre of Augsburg, too. When we checked out we wanted to pay for our breakfast with a voucher. They accepted this and very kindly credited us with the remaining value of the voucher which we had not been able to spend. We checked out very early and the overnight receptionist was very kind, pleasant and helpful. She tried to give us take away coffees as we were too early for breakfast. Address: Halderstrasse 25, Augsburg, Bavaria, 86150, Germany.

Ibis Augsburg Hauptbahnhof - Augsburg

Ibis Augsburg Hauptbahnhof - Augsburg

The Synagogue.

Our hotel was quite close to Augsburg's synagogue. It looked attractive from the outside. We did not manage to go inside. Augsburg Synagogue was built between 1914 and 1917. The building was badly damaged during the Night of Broken Glass in 1938. Fortunately it was restored in 1985. It is now home to the Jewish Culture Museum of Augsburg. Opening times: Tuesday­ - Thursday 9am­6pm, Friday 9am- ­4pm, Sunday & public holidays 10am­ - 5pm.

The Synagogue

The Synagogue

Town Hall Square.

This wide open square contains the town hall, the Perlachturm Tower, the Augustus fountain, the tourist information office and some restaurants. I was surprised on our first visit that this area was not pedestrianized. However, on our second visit it was and it was much more pleasant as a result.

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square Revisited - Augsburg

Town Hall Square

Town Hall Square

Fugger House and Statue.

Not far from the town hall is a statue of Jakob Fugger who was once the world's richest man. He is credited with founding the Fuggerei which is the world's first welfare housing project. Low cost housing was provided to poor, deserving Catholic families in return for a nominal rent and a promise to pray for the Fugger family. Fugger's house is behind the statue.

Fugger House and Statue

Fugger House and Statue

Fugger House and Statue

Fugger House and Statue

The Artisan's Quarter.

The Artisan's Quarter is the area behind the town hall. In my opinion it is the loveliest part of Augsburg. It had old houses, narrow streets and little canals. We very much enjoyed strolling around this area and wished we had had more time here.

The Artisans Quarter.

The Artisans Quarter.

Augsburg street. - Augsburg

Augsburg street. - Augsburg

Brecht's House.

We just looked at the outside of Bertold Brech's Haus. We did not have time to go to the museum inside. The house is fairly plain from the front, but looks quite interesting from the back. Brecht was born here in 1898. Across from the museum there is a bar called Brecht's.

Brecht's House

Brecht's House

Brecht's House

Brecht's House

The Church of the Holy Cross.

The Holy Cross Church is a Roman Catholic church. Its name comes from an ancient cross relic which can still be seen in Augsburg's Diocesan Museum. The history of this church goes back to 1143 when a hospice with a chapel was constructed on this site. The present church was built by Provost Vitus Fackler in 1508. The church was badly damaged by bombing in the Second World War. Rebuilding was finished in 1949.

The Holy Cross Church

The Holy Cross Church

The Holy Cross Church

The Holy Cross Church

The Holy Cross Church

The Holy Cross Church

The Hofgarten.

After visiting the Church of the Holy Cross, we walked to the Hofgarten. This courtyard garden was built in the eighteenth century as the garden of the prince bishop's residence. This was a lovely place with beautiful flowers and trees. It also had a pond, some strange dwarf statues and its very own bookcase. This bookcase was presented to the people of Augsburg in 2001 by the American artists Michael Clegg and Martin Guttmann. It is entitled 'The library should open as a public bookcase'. The idea is that people may take books from here and return them or donate books to here.

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Hofgarten

The Fronhof.

Close to the hofgarten is the Fronhof. This huge building used to be the residence of the prince bishops of Augsburg. The hofgarten was originally part of its garden. Around the building itself there is still a lovely garden. I was particularly impressed with the huge sunflowers there.

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Fronhof

The Cathedral of Augsburg.

On our first visit to Augsburg we walked to the cathedral, but did not have time to go in as we had to rush to catch a train. On our second visit we went in, but could not go anywhere inside as there was a service taking place. Similarly we could not take any photos. The Cathedral of Augsburg is a Roman Catholic church in Augsburg founded in the 11th century. It is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. There is quite an interesting and impressive statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral. It is obviously Christian in nature. It depicts a standing bishop, a figure on horseback brandishing a cross and a third standing figure manacled to a tree. A fierce looking dog is barking at them. Water spouts from fish heads at the bottom of the statue.

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral of Augsburg - Augsburg

The Cathedral

The Cathedral

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Statue in front of Augsburg Cathedral - Augsburg

Roman Remains.

Augsburg is Germany's third oldest city. It was founded by the Romans as Augusta Vindelicorum. The city was named after the Roman Emperor Augustus. Between the Fronhof and the cathedral there were some Ancient Roman remains.

Roman Remains

Roman Remains

Roman Remains

Roman Remains

Other Augsburg Sights.

St. Ulrich's and St. Afra's Abbey.

At the end of a busy main road in Augsburg you will suddenly come upon the beautiful Abbey of St. Ulrich's and St. Afra. This is a former Benedictine abbey. It is dedicated to Saint Ulrich and Saint Afra. It is believed there has been a religious building at this site since as early as the 10th century, possibly even earlier.

St. Ulrich's and St. Afra's Abbey

St. Ulrich's and St. Afra's Abbey

St. Ulrich's and St. Afra's Abbey

St. Ulrich's and St. Afra's Abbey

The Market.

There was a colourful market next to Saint Anna's Church. We had a stroll around here and found it quite interesting with its fruit, vegetable and flower stalls. I always like to visit an open air market everywhere we go. They afford lots of opportunities for taking many photos.

The market

The market

The market

The market

Fountains

Augsburg had several interesting fountains. These include the Fountain of Mercury, the Fountain of the Emperor Augustus and the Fountain of Hercules. All of these fountains are quite impressive and are certainly worth seeing.

Hercules Fountain. - Augsburg

Hercules Fountain. - Augsburg

Mercury fountain. - Augsburg

Mercury fountain. - Augsburg

Detail from the Hercules fountain/ - Augsburg

Detail from the Hercules fountain/ - Augsburg

Augsburg Theatre.

As we were wandering around Augsburg we came across its theatre. This was located on a busy road and had a large sculpture outside. I rather liked the style of the building. When we were there it was showing performances of the Blues Brothers.

Augsburg Theatre

Augsburg Theatre

Augsburg Theatre

Augsburg Theatre

Brecht Theatre.

Behind the main theatre is the Brechtbuhne ­ a theatre named after Bertold Brecht. Brecht was born in Augsburg in 1869. This theatre was inaugurated in 2012. It can seat 250 people. The front of the theatre is designed to look like a theatre curtain.

Brecht Theatre

Brecht Theatre

Faces of Augsburg.

I like to look closely at the outside of old buildings. I am particularly interested on any carvings of faces on them. I find these very interesting,sometimes amusing, sometimes impressive, sometimes even scary. I will include here two faces which appealed to me in Augsburg.

Faces Of Augsburg

Faces Of Augsburg

Faces Of Augsburg

Faces Of Augsburg

Posted by irenevt 06:48 Archived in Germany Comments (0)

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